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20110701
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. dr. jon lapook has more on that. >> reporter: with a generation of kids connected to each other through cell phones, doctors like keith black have concerns about safety. >> what we know is that the microwave radiation from cell phones will penetrate deeper into the child's brain and more of the radiation goes into the brain because the scalp is thinner, the skull is thinner. >> reporter: in today's study, researchers compared cell phone use in healthy children and 352 brain tumor patients between the ages of seven and 19. cell phone use did not significantly increase the risk of a brain tumor. this research comes just two months after the world health organization categorized cell phones as possibly carcinogenic. 75% of teenagers now have a cell phone, up from fritsch% in 2004 so a clearer picture of safety will only come from long-term study. >> what we're really concerned about is the child who begins using the cell phone at seven or 12, when they become an adult after 20 or 30 years of using the cell phone, is their risk higher? that is not answered by this study. >> reporter
a prayer for today's meeting then you have senator jon kyl, a republican, saying that the white house essentially walked away from $500 billion in cuts that the do sides had already agreed to so no one right now can point to any progress that these talks are achieving. >> pelley: senator mcconnell proposed a stopgap plan today in case they miss the deadline. what was that about? >> well, it's a pretty complicated plan, scott, and it essentially boils down to allowing the president to raise the debt limit in fits and starts over the next year and a half and essentially puts off any talk of spending cuts to a later date. the plan went over with a thud among house republicans who see this as giving in, but mcconnell says that he doesn't want to be a party to default and he certainly doesn't want republicans to be blamed if there is a default, scott. >> pelley: thanks, nancy. this deal to reduce the deficit could be huge. somewhere between $1 and $4 trillion. they're talking about taxes, social security, medicare, defense and most everyone agrees thisv it has to be done by next week to gi
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